Poems in September

Poems in Septembver
Poems in September

I usually post my fresh collection of poems in the middle of each month to inspire me as I go through the next 15 days, but this edition of poems in September was delayed for quite a while. Can you believe we’re only several days away from October? I honestly haven’t been reading much poetry aside from Olivia Gatwood’s Life of The Party (reviewed here!), which is undoubtedly one of my favorite poetry books of all time, but I found a handful of pieces that I loved reading over the past month. Each of my poems in September was written by a poet of color whom I deeply respect and admire and have more than once obsessed over their paperback books. I find that I tend to establish a vague theme in every installment of monthly poems and September would have to revolve around melancholy– the exact emotion I wrestled with over the past few months. “Therapy” by Audre Lorde is one of my all-time favorites from the incredibly brilliant poet/activist and it’s basically a written mirror to my own recent therapy sessions, which *spoiler alert* focus a lot on grief and trauma. “After Being Asked if I Write the ‘Occasional Poem'” by Kimiko Hahn was in one of the September editions of the New Yorker and it was such an incredible elegy for Jakelin Caal Maquin— the seven year old Guatemalan girl who died in Border Patrol custody. I think it’s easy to forget about all of the tragedies in the world as they tend to compile into one devastating mass, but Hahn’s piece reminded me to never forget Jakelin and all of the babies whose lives and deaths have so easily been erased. “To Life” by Li-Young Lee is the first piece in his chapbook and it was the one I immediately gravitated toward when I read the collection last year. This piece specifically has resonated with me as I’ve truly been in the dumps since May. It almost feels like I could just be reading Audre Lorde’s pieces instead of going to therapy (just kidding, this is a bad idea…poetry AND therapy, Noelle) since she writes about everything I lament over and “Hard Love Rock” is a perfect example. My god if I could only write the way Lorde did. “Then Came Flowers” by Rita Dove is the last of my poems in September and it’s such a gorgeous piece that makes me remember poems don’t have to always be long and drawn out. Sometimes the most delicious ones are brief and hit you straight in the face.

Follow: