Poems in January

Poems in January
Poems in January

Barely over a week ago, I shared my favorite spoken word poems I discovered over the past year that inspired my writings and made me want to jump on stage. Despite my desire to only read poems out loud, I do appreciate a strictly kept-on-page-only type of piece that doesn’t require oral transcriptions. The theme of my poems in January (though the selections as a whole usually never have a theme) is love– lost, newly discovered, broken, all that jazz, because it’s January and is there any better time to dive headfirst into a pile of love pieces? I think not. One of my 2020 New Year’s Resolutions is to write 1-2 poems a month, so I’ve been reading a lot more than usual. I find that my creativity is engaged when I read pieces that truly make me want to create my own inspired versions or at least pen similar topics. For no particular reason at all, I’ve been much more drawn toward the idea of love in its different stages and types as I recently wrote one of my most favorite pieces about the same concept. It’s quite difficult to write about love without sounding like every other goddamn person who’s crafted a love poem or song, but let’s be honest, it’s the most popular subject so of course the cliches pop up in my mind. These poems in January are my muses in a trial run away from the classic Shakespearean or modern social media-driven love pieces. Sarah Kay wrote “Until” in all its New York glory and I’ve never wanted to be a poem so badly. I’m ecstatic about the process of creating a piece that talks about a feeling and a specific moment in time with a lover without trying to fit too much in those lines. My greatest struggle when I’m writing is that I force paragraphs into stanzas that don’t require an overabundance of detail. Sarah includes the perfect amount of everything in every piece, but especially this one. “Evening Song” by Willa Cather and “I Am Like A Leaf” by Yone Noguchi are both from Poets.org and I love how they each discuss love in a more somber tone and Jessica Rae Bergamino’s “Did Rise” functions almost like a zombie-esque to-do list with a short glimpse of freedom in the final sentence. If you’re in the same mood for written love and beautiful language, I highly recommend Sarah Kay’s No Matter the Wreckage or any daily piece from Poets.org!

Follow: